THE LAND OF CHERRIES 

ZUGER CHRIESI (ZUG CHERRIES) 

They have been our traditional fruit since they were brought here more than 600 years ago. They are part of Switzerland’s intangible cultural heritage and they bear the AOP/PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) seal. They are famous far beyond our borders and they are the ultimate symbol of Zug: the Zuger Chriesi (Zug cherries). As you walk on the rolling hills of Zugerland, you can marvel at the spectacle of the blossoming cherry trees. Come and experience the quirky customs surrounding this pretty red fruit, or sample Zug’s cherry specialities at one of its gorgeous cafés. 

Hard facts & Story

Facts & stories

OUR TRADITIONAL FRUIT 

The cherry found its way to Europe via the Roman general Lucius Licinius Lucullus in 74 BC. Legend has it that after his victory over Mithradates VI Eupator of Pontus, he paraded through the streets of Rome, carrying a small cherry tree with ripe cherries on it. This is how the fruit, which is native to the Black Sea, is said to have found its way to Europe. The Romans also planted the cherry trees north of the Alps, and even in Britain. The oldest cherry stones ever found in the Canton of Zug were excavated at Cham-Hagendorn. They are thought to be almost 1,800 years old.

1627

SWITZERLAND'S FIRST CHRIESIMÄRT  

The first Zug Chriesimärt (“Cherry Market”) was held almost 400 years ago. That makes it Switzerland's oldest cherry market. The Chriesimärt, the Chriesigloggä (“Cherry Bell”) and the Chriesisturm (“Cherry Storm” race) are still well-known and popular traditional events, even beyond the borders of the canton. 

1870

ZUG CHERRIES EXPORTED AROUND THE WORLD 

 Exportation of Zuger Kirsch around the world started 150 years ago. This is what made Zug cherry products world-famous—they were already famous in the local region. Since 2013, Zuger Kirsch has enjoyed AOP status (Appellation d’Origine Protégée, also known as PDO / protected designation of origin). 

1915

THE FIRST ZUGER KIRSCHTORTE 

 The Zug confectioner Heinrich Höhn invented the Zuger Kirschtorte (Zug cherry cake) more than 100 years ago. In 2008, it was officially included in the register of the Culinary Heritage of Switzerland and, since 2015, it has had IGP (Indication Géografique Protégée) status, also known as protected geographical indication (PGI). 

2008

FOUNDING OF IG ZUGER CHRIESI 

Since it was founded, IG Zuger Chriesi (the Zug Cherries Interest Group) has planted 1,000 new cherry trees. But the members do more than just plant trees, they also protect the local traditions around the cherries. Thanks to them, future generations will be able to know and cherish these traditions. 

Compiled for you

Chriesiwanderungen und -Telefon

Chriesitelefon

What are the blossoms up to? 

CHRIESITELEFON (CHERRY BLOSSOM PHONE LINE) 

Generally speaking, mid-April to the beginning of May is blossoming time, not only for the cherry trees but also for the apricot, apple and pear trees. The splendid flowers attract bees and hikers alike. It is a well-known fact that nature knows no deadlines. Sometimes the trees blossom earlier, sometimes later. We will keep an eye on the blossoms for you, so that you don't miss out on this natural spectacle. Our Chriesitelefon service will keep you informed about what’s blooming when: +41 41 723 68 00.